Wednesday, January 4, 2017

The Watercolorist

After reaching the heights of the Moorish District of Frigiliana on Monday (see yesterday's post), we came upon an artist's studio. Above the door was a sign that read "Acuarelas" (Watercolors). The works displayed outside were so intriguing that we decided to go in for a closer look. (Click the images for the color enlargements.)

KLAUS HINKEL.
We were greeted by a charming man who turned out to be the artist, Klaus Hinkel (check out his website here). Klaus has had his studio in Frigiliana for 20 years. During our entire visit, I kept thinking how much My Mother The Watercolorist Dowager Duchess would have loved Klaus and his work. This was a day I would have enjoyed sharing with her.

San Geraldo and I very quickly fell in love with a large, framed, fine-art giclee print. Klaus painted the original during one of many trips to Morocco. The original painting now hangs in Boston, Massachusetts, where San Geraldo and I first met.

Judyshannonstreetwhat chose three small, unframed Frigiliana street scenes.

When Judy wondered aloud how she would get a large framed painting home to Seattle, Klaus said, "Oh, it rolls."

We all looked perplexed and imagined attaching wheels to the bottom of the frame.

Judy followed with, "And then what, it would just fit under my seat on the plane?"

Klaus laughed and said, "I mean, I take it out of the frame and it rolls [up] in a cardboard tube."

"PACIENCIA" (PATIENCE). 75 X 63 CM (30 X 25 INCHES).
PROUDLY DISPLAYED IN OUR LIVING ROOM.

Klaus and I initially began to converse in Spanish and he asked where I was from. When I told him I was American, he was surprised. I've been told at times I speak Spanish with an Italian accent. But Klaus, originally from Germany, told me he thought I was either Swedish or German. Ach du lieber and Swedish meatballs! Swedish or German? Italian and Spanish are at least both Romance languages!


These are called "panqueques" in Spanish. Or, as I pronounce it, Flappen Jacken Hooten...

16 comments:

  1. My grandmother always said to her grandchildren "patience is a virtue".....this is a lovely watercolour, Mitch.
    Are Italian and Brooklynese accents similar? Maybe you are a universal man!

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    1. Jim:
      I lost most of my New York accent 40 years ago and Italian was never part of my English sounds, although in the '70s I did fall in love with Italy and all things Italian, and I learned to imitate the accent fairly well -- not well enough to even approach fluency, but well enough to sound Italian when I speak Spanish I guess. As for my Swedish accent, Swedish friends and too much time watching the Swedish chef (who taught me to cook) may have something to do with it!

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  2. I like your taste in art and Muppetry.

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    1. Frank:
      We are in love with this painting. Wish we had more walls!

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  3. Oh! this post is one of my favourites Mitch. Your selection is so calming, so soft and ethereal and that is so good for one's soul. DD was with you (at least I think she was)and now the painting graces your walls. So, just a quick roll up into a tube and one could own one of these beauties. Perfect.
    As an aside, we watched an art series from Britain, a contest ~ Sky Arts Portrait Artist of the Year 2013. We were so hooked on this show and hope to see more like this. All types of art displayed for the viewers. Nick Lord won.
    Thanks for your view on life Mitch.
    Cheers
    Ron

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    1. Ron:
      Any day with a visit from you is a better day! Thanks so much. Jerry and I fell in love with this painting the minute we saw it.

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  4. I love that painting. I would display it proudly, too! The "oh, it rolls" comment made me laugh.

    An old woman from somewhere in South America (I don't remember where) once scornfully told me that "you speak Spanish with a heavy American accent" to which I wanted to reply "Well, DUH!" I mean, what else would my accent sound like? Especially since I'm learning through a self guided course. She looked at me like I was some sort of idiot, all because I attempted to speak to her in Spanish (it was at work). Most Spanish speakers have been very kind and gracious, but some are jerks. Like the old man from Spain who told me I was wasting my time trying to learn Spanish and I would never be any good unless I went and lived somewhere else for a year or so. I was so discouraged!

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    1. Jennifer:
      Here we've been met almost 100 percent of the time with patience and appreciation for our attempts at communicating solely in Spanish. Very few disappointing encounters, which I try really hard to quickly forget.

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  5. Nice work. Watercolor is an unforgiving medium. I only have a few watercolor paintings and I'm not particularly proud of them.

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    1. Stephen:
      I've never been a painter or had any training although I've made brief attempts. I found watercolor to be the most daunting. My mother started in oils but ended up loving watercolor. Klaus amazes me.

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  6. Am loving the muted tones of that painting!

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    1. John:
      Such unusual tones and so much precision. I'm in awe. It has really lit up our living room.

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  7. That is the most detailed watercolor painting I ever saw. Wow.

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    1. mistress maddie:
      Klaus is exceptional and his work varies from this kind of precision to what looks more like abstract expressionism. Portraits, street scenes, landscapes. What talent... and craft.

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